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CAL-PT-FUND Grants
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Grants

Today the CAL-PT-FUND’s highest priority is to provide research grants to CPTA members in order to advance evidence based practice and to build a cadre of practitioner scholars. The Fund annually awards up to $10,000 in grant funding for relevant research that will continue to build our body of knowledge. The goal of the Fund is to provide $25,000 each for two grants per year. The Fund is attempting to raise $500,000 in order to award the grants from the interest earned on account, thus insuring the future of California funding for California physical therapists and physical therapist assistant practitioner scholars.

CAL-PT-FUND Grant Application

Thank you for your interest in the California Physical Therapy Fund’s research study grant program. To be eligible to apply for a grant, you must be a member of the California Physical Therapy Association. The research study must relate to physical therapy. Priority will be given to research study proposals that seek to validate the clinical techniques in physical therapy (Clinical Validation Research Study), but applications for Basic Research Study grants are also considered.

The 2016 Grant Application period has ended. The 2017 Grant Application will be available on January 2, 2017.

Before you Apply

Tips & Tricks

Check out these helpful tips from previous grant applicants and the reviewers themselves!

Grant Review Form

Take a look at what we will be evaluating when we receive your application so that you can make sure you have all of the required components!

The Foundation for Physical Therapy

There are also research grants, fellowships, and scholarships available through the Foundation for Physical Therapy. These are for larger projects and all Physical Therapists (not just Californians) are eligible. You can access the current list of available gifts by visiting their website. For more information about the Foundation for Physical Therapy, please contact Info@Foundation4PT.org

The CAL-PT-FUND is proud to announce that we have partnered with The Foundation for Physical Therapy to support larger research projects and scholarships for Californians. We look forward to working with The Foundation in the coming years and hope that our partnership will encourage more California PTs and PTAs to apply for funding through them.


Active CAL-PT-FUND Funded Research Projects

Susan SigSusan Sigward Photoward PT, PhD, ATC is an Assistant Professor in Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy at the University of Southern California. As the Director of the division’s Human Performance Laboratory her research focuses on rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLr), with a specific emphasis on the effects of early rehabilitation interventions on long-term outcomes. Recent studies illustrating the persistence of altered knee joint loading during gait up to 24 months post ACLr suggest that current rehabilitation programs are not adequately resolving motor impairments. The presence of these strategies in the absence of joint level impairments suggests that they may be the result motor adaption that occurred during early recovery and rehabilitation. Dr. Sigward’s proposed study aims to use gait training to shape knee loading behaviors during early rehabilitation in attempts to avoid the long-term adoption of faulty mechanics. The results of this clinical efficacy study will be used to develop a larger scale clinical trial.

  

Jo Armour Smith, PT, PhD, OCS is an Adjunct Professor of Clinical Physical Therapy in the Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy at the University of Southern California. Though she is early in her career as a physical therapy researcher, she has already completed several research projects investigating postural control of the trunk. In her previous studies, she has used a number of biomechanical methodologies to quantify trunk control in health and disease during dynamic postural activities. The purpose of her current study is to investigate the neural correlations of healthy and disordered trunk postural control and the corticomotor plasticity associated with acute motor-sill interventions, using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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