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Featured Researcher - Fall 2015

Timothy Gilleran, PT, DPTSc, ATC

“In 2008, after 18 years as a practicing clinician and academician, I enrolled in the post-professional doctoral training program in the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science at the University of California, San Francisco. I received my post-professional doctoral degree (DPTSc) in Physical Therapy Science in 2013 after completing my academic studies and a research project investigating the effects of recurrent lateral ankle sprains on dynamic postural control and joint biomechanics of the lower extremity. After graduation, I was privileged to be awarded the CAL-PT-FUND Grant which supports my current post-doctoral research project in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at University of California, San Francisco. The CAL-PT-FUND Grant provided me with the requisite funds to examine ankle and knee articular cartilage with magnetic resonance imaging. This financial support has enabled me to successfully complete this study and produce multiple abstracts which have been accepted for upcoming CPTA and APTA Combined Sections meetings. The CAL-PT-FUND Grant is a critical funding source for new investigators, and I truly appreciate the assistance of the CAL-PT-FUND during these initial stages of my research career.”


Dr. Timothy J. Gilleran is Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Doctor Physical Therapy Program at Samuel Merritt University and holds an Affiliate Researcher position in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Gilleran received a post-professional doctoral degree (DPTSc) in Physical Therapy Science in 2013 to study the effects of recurrent lateral ankle sprains on dynamic postural control and joint biomechanics of the lower extremity. He is currently working on a post-doctoral research project examining the effects of ankle sprains on cartilage biochemical structure of the ankle and knee joints. The overall goal of his research is to develop a clearer understanding of the local and regional effects of ankle instability on dynamic postural control, joint biomechanics and cartilage biochemical structure of the lower extremity joints.

 

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