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Conference Session Descriptions
 

Handouts

Some handouts may not be available. If handouts are available, the course title will be highlighted in blue and available to download. All handouts are in .pdf format. Please note: some speakers have elected to not provide handouts. If you have difficulty accessing the handouts, please contact Allison Wiesemann.

How many CEUs can I earn?

You can earn up to 14.5 Contact Hours (1.45 CEUs) for attending our Conference this year. There are 10.5 Contact Hours that can be earned by attending educational sessions and 4 Contact Hours that are earned for attending a conference sponsored by the CPTA (1399.94. Authorized Pathways for Obtaining Hours). CA licentiates cannot earn CEUs for attending the Presidential Address or CA PTEd Talks.

Saturday, October 3

8:00 - 8:00 a.m.
Presidential Address

8:30 - 9:30 a.m.
Keynote Address - Creating a Healthier World By Addressing Social Determinants of Health

The current US healthcare system is characterized by unconscionable disparities, poor outcomes and unsustainable costs. We must redesign the care delivery system to one which focuses on health equity and addresses the social determinants of health. Factors such as race/ethnicity, education, housing, geography, job opportunities and socioeconomic status are powerful drivers of health status and addressing these issues as health issues makes both societal and financial sense. Barriers to achieving this change are myriad, but progress is being made. Successful implementation of a “social determinants approach” requires intersectoral collaboration, policy changes, technologic solutions and new payment models, as well as a commitment to training a diverse health workforce. The arc of the moral universe bends towards justice, but it doesn’t do so on its own. Health care professionals must embrace their altruistic obligation to strive to improve health for all.

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • List the major social determinants of health and their impact on health status and outcomes
  • Understand the role of social determinants in health disparities
  • Articulate examples of current approaches and tools for addressing social determinants in clinical care
  • Plan changes in their own practice which will help address the social determinants of health for their patients

 

CA PTEd Talks: 9:45 - 11:00 a.m.

Speaker(s): Chukwuemeka Nwigwe, PT, DPT; Preeti Oza, PT, PhD; and Amber Fitzsimmons, PT, DPTSc

TBD

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • TBD

 

COVID-19 Panel: 11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Speaker: Mandy Johnston, PTA, MEd Impact of COVID on PTA Education

Speaker: Todd Davenport, PT, DPT Impact of COVID-19 on PT

Speaker: Heidi Engel, PT, DPT Long Term Effects

Course Descriptions and Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • TBD

 

Afternoon Sessions: 1:45 - 3:15 p.m.

Speaker: Curtis Yee, PT, MSPT “A Look Inside” Benefits of Diagnostic MSK Ultrasound

Speaker: Peter Tass, MD, PhD “Innovations in Vibrations” for Movement Dysfunction

Speaker: Karen Moran, PT  “Beyond the Clinic” Integrating Functional Movement into Performing Arts

Course Descriptions and Objectives

“A Look Inside” Benefits of Diagnostic MSK Ultrasound
This talk will describe what is Diagnostic Ultrasound versus Therapeutic Ultrasound; Diagnostic Ultrasound imaging as an extension of the Physical Therapy clinical examination; Describe how Diagnostic Ultrasound is used in Musculoskeletal imaging; Present examples of normal and abnormal sonoanatomy; Describe the steps needed to learn and become proficient in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound, including pathways towards certification.

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Describe applications of Diagnostic Ultrasound
  • Understand how Diagnostic Ultrasound is used as an extension of the Physical Therapy clinical examination
  • Describe how Diagnostic Ultrasound can be used in Musculoskeletal imaging
  • Understand the basic steps needed to learn Musculoskeletal Ultrasound, including pathways towards certification

Speaker: Mitchel Kaye, PT “What’s Trending” Medicare Outpatient Physical Therapy Hot Topics

Speaker: Marilyn Washington, PT A Look at Medicare’s New Skilled Nursing Payment System

Speaker: Diane Blagojevich, PT Demystifying the Patient-Driven Groupings Model

Course Descriptions and Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

 

Late Afternoon Sessions: 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Speaker: Francisco Dela Cruz, PT, DPT

Successful management of musculoskeletal pain syndrome requires a multi-factorial approach. An understanding of the involvement of the movement system is an essential component. This course is designed to provide a deeper understanding of the functional approach in the evaluation & management of musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Functional regional interdependence between the muscular, osteo-articular and central nervous system in the regulation of movement will be a focus of discussion and practice. Clinical reasoning of the evaluation and management process and its integration with manual orthopedic procedures will be discussed along with the integration of the different movement concepts to create a more comprehensive and functional exercise.

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:


Speaker: Oscar Gallardo, PT, DPT Utilizing Community Collaboration to Develop Programs to Improve Health Equity

Speaker: Ben Cornell, PT Student-led Pro-bono Care in an Underserved Population: Physical Therapy for People Experiencing Homelessness

Speaker: Katrin Mattern-Baxter, PT, DPT Knowledge Translation in a Collaborative Approach: The Supported Treadmill Exercise Program Sacramento State/Easter Seals

Course Descriptions and Objectives

Utilizing Community Collaboration to Develop Programs to Improve Health Equity
Describe ways to develop community partnerships which increase access to PT services in underserved communities.

Student-led Pro-bono Care in an Underserved Population: Physical Therapy for People Experiencing Homelessness
Principle 8 of the APTA code of ethics is specific regarding the need to provide pro-bono services to underserved populations. One such group is people experiencing homelessness and who have limited access to health care, including physical therapy. In order to address this need, a partnership has been developed between the Union Rescue Mission and Mount St. Mary’s University for a student-run physical therapy clinic. Over nearly a decade, DPT students have collaborated with medical professionals while serving in a unique setting. A description of the development, structure, barriers, and successes of the program will be provided to the audience.

Following this presentation and active discussion, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the potential barriers and solutions to a public/private partnership for pro-bono PT services
  • Distinguish between school-based and community-based pro-bono PT practices
  • Describe the learning opportunities available to PT students providing care to an underserved population
  • Describe methods to grow pro-bono services in a community setting

Knowledge Translation in a Collaborative Approach: The Supported Treadmill Exercise Program Sacramento State/Easter Seals
Physical therapy service delivery to young children with neuromotor impairment is usually limited to once weekly sessions or less, even though research supports more intense therapeutic interventions for optimal neuroplastic changes in the developing brain. In order to close the gap between the required and the customarily provided dosage of motor interventions related to walking, researchers and clinicians successfully collaborated and implemented an ancillary programs to increase accessibility to therapist-guided, structured walking interventions: The Supported Treadmill Exercise Program Sacramento State-Easter Seals (STEPS). The steps from concept to implementation will be described, and outcomes from more than 5 years of program data will be shared with the audience. 

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how collaboration between an academic and clinical setting led to conceptualization of the program
  • Understand the process of implementing knowledge translation into applied practice
  • Describe difficulties and provide solutions for implementing a community program 
  • Describe the systematic data collection /outcome measures of the community program 
  • Learn about program outcomes: demographics, clinical outcomes, and perspectives of the families 

 

 

Sunday, October 4

8:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Keynote Address: Working with Clients Using Cannabis: Ethical, Legal and Clinical Considerations for the Physical Therapist and the Physical Therapy Assistant 


This presentation addresses the potential treatment dilemmas that a physical therapist and/or physical therapy assistant may face when a client discloses that they are using cannabis for medical or non-medical purposes. An overview of cannabis health effects and legal status in California will be provided. Ethical considerations related to risk, the therapeutic relationship and clinical integrity considering the principles and standards of the American Physical Therapy Association Code of Ethics will be highlighted.

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

  • Identify terminology and normalization of cannabis use in the United States.
  • Understand the legal status and medical/legal considerations of cannabis.
  • Recognize the role of continued self-education as it applies to the legal and social status of cannabis.
  • Apply the health and risk outcomes of cannabis to physical therapy clinical practice.
  • Understand the ethical considerations that guide the recommendation of medical cannabis.
  • Understand screening, risk, counseling and education needs of patients related to cannabis.
  • Recognize the need for cannabinoid dose and label accuracy in medical cannabis products.

 

Mid-Morning Sessions: 10:15 - 11:45 p.m.

Speaker: Various

[Course Description]

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:


Speaker: Sujay Galen, PT, PhD

[Course Description]

Course Objectives

Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:


Speaker: Sturdy McKee, PT

Business owners can get caught in the past and forget to plan for their future. Companies like Kodak, Sears, and Blackberry are cases in point because they did not adapt and focus forward.

Our environment has changed and continues to change rapidly forcing us to adapt or follow in the footsteps of Kodak and Sears.

During the talk Sturdy will share:

  • cautionary tales of companies that did not adapt to their changing environments
  • the trends that are currently and rapidly changing our world
  • the 5 Levels of Focus Forward Development 
  • three next steps to take now
  • the 12 Focus Forward Pillars to shore up your business and re-envision it for the future
  • the 5 Advanced Pillars for advanced business training and development

 

    Course Objectives

    Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the roles of the owner in your business from Individual Contributor to Entrepreneur and identify the roles of the people in your business.
    • Gain a working understanding of the component parts of a business that you didn't learn in school. 
    • Be able to focus on the future and how your business will adapt to the changes happening all around us. 
    • Take away at least one tangible process or tactic that you can apply to your business immediately.

     

     

    Afternoon Sessions: 12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

    Speaker(s): Rachel Tran PT, DPT and Judson Smith PT, DPT

    Thanks to advances in medicine, there are currently more than 17 million cancer survivors in the US. Of the approximately 16000 children diagnosed with cancer in the US each year, 80% are expected to survive into early adulthood. While cured of their disease, survivors face a lifelong battle with the effects of cancer treatment. Cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neurotoxic conditions as well as frailty, pain, and fatigue are well documented long term side effects of cancer treatment. Additional biopsychosocial factors are commonly present in the life of cancer survivors, further impacting quality of life. The presenters will summarize common pediatric cancer diagnoses and treatments, and the long term effects of these treatments. Subsequent emphasis will be placed the various biopsychosocial issues that exists in childhood cancer survivorship. Attendees will leave understanding the important role that rehab professionals must play in the identification and management of survivorship issues in this vulnerable population.

    Course Objectives

    Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

    • Identify common childhood cancers including prevalence, physiology, and survival rates
    • Describe the relationship between medical treatment for childhood cancers and long-term morbidities that affect survivors into early and late adulthood
    • Identify common biopsychosocial factors present in cancer survivors and describe their impact on quality of life in this population
    • Define the role of physical therapists in identification and management of the late effects of childhood cancer treatment

    Speaker: Jason Kaiser

    [Course Description]

    Course Objectives

    Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:


    Speaker: Jerry Hesch, PT

    Multiple studies on SIJ movement have shown imperceptible movement. The entire pelvic moves in three-dimensional space and deformable soft tissue including muscle, tendon and ligament respond which can give the observer the impression that aberrant movement is occurring inside the SIJ. However, hundreds of MRI images of the sacroiliac joint have been observed by the author in which the client presents with treatable pelvic asymmetry yet, there is perfect congruency in all SIJ images in each plane of the body. 

    A very gentle treatment approach is presented and as an astute observer noted: “By going slower and more gently I believe we are returning the innate mobility of the joints in a way the brain and nervous system agree with.” 

    A model of dysfunctional movement inside the SIJ is not necessary, cannot be objectified in the rehab setting, and can be counter-production to effective patient management.

    Course Objectives

    Following this presentation and active discussion, participants will be able to:

    • Analyze the significant limitations of the symmetrical/ asymmetrical and alignment theory of SIJD
    • Recognize painful and non-painful impairments
    • Understand evidence-based practice principles
    • Discuss research and theoretical literature
    • Understand that some patterns described in the MET model are untenable 
    • Understand the value of low-load long-duration stretch mobilization with a fulcrum and how it is more effective than MET
    • Realize that many patterns of so-called SIJD do not have a discernible within the joint problem and many are how the pelvis moves in 3-D space moving with the trunk and with the hips